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Mar 19

Recently it has been proposed that the practice of mandarins travelling in official litters should be reinstalled.

An official litterMajor advantages of the proposed change are:
1. Environmental friendly; no carbon emission.
2. Create jobs. Assuming 4 people are needed to lift each litter, this proposal creates 32 million employment opportunities.
 3. Save $150 billion yuan annually on government vehicle operating cost.
 4. Eliminate traffic congestion in metropolitan areas.
 5. Entrepreneurs will emulate what officials do and thus double its impact on job growth. .
 6. Commoners can stop the litter to air their grievances

Nov 09

Pacific Rim Shots

Written by: Steve | Filed under:General | Tags:, , , , ,
9 Comments » newest 2013-06-12 03:09:49

I’d like to announce our blog to the Fool’s Mountain audience, an offshoot of this blog written by Wukailong, whose comments and posts you’re probably familiar with, and Steve (that’s me). Rather than write specifically about China, we’ve opened it up to the entire Pacific Rim and have posted articles about many countries, though because our backgrounds are in China and Taiwan, they are the subject of the brunt of our articles.

Unlike most blogs about China and East Asia, we tend to stay away from current political affairs and are more on the cultural side, though we do dabble in politics every once in awhile. We figured the political and current event scene was covered ad nauseum by other blogs out there and didn’t want to be a ‘me too’ site. If you like music, movies, photography, culture, travel and food, you might enjoy checking us out.

We also have a continuing feature, a photo after every 3rd post, from Jesse, who lives in Beijing and has his own blog where he posts one photo per day, everyday. His headlines are as good as his photos!

As the title states, our site is called Pacific Rim Shots. You can find us here: http://pacificrimshots.com/

Hope to see you there!

Oct 25

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expo_2010
70 million visitors are expected to visit the expo, making it the most visited in history.
[from 1.may till 31.oct expected 70 million visitors is about 0.38millions/day]

http://big5.xinhuanet.com/gate/big5/news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2010-09/11/c_13489798.htm
The ongoing Shanghai World Expo 2010 has received 50 million visitors as of 5:31 p.m. Friday [10. sept]
[1.may-10.sep 50M/130d = reached 0.38M/d but:]

The bureau estimates, by the end of the Expo, that the number of visitors to the 184-day event will reach around 60 million.
[10.sep-31.oct 60M-50M = 10M, 10M/50d = expected average about 0.2M/d during the last exhibition days, but:]

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2010-10/08/c_13547307.htm
The ongoing Shanghai World Expo 2010 had received more than 60 million visitors as of Friday noon [8. oct]
[10.sep-8.oct 60M-50M = 10M, 10M/30d = grow to 0.3M/d, even with new record:]
The event saw a record high of 630,000 visitors on Sept. 23, the second day of the three-day Mid-Autumn Festival holiday.

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2010-10/16/c_13560768.htm
A total of 1.03 million people visited the Shanghai World Exposition on Saturday [16. oct], a record number since the Expo opened.
The Expo had received some 64.62 million visitors by the end of Saturday [16. oct]
[9.oct-16.oct 64,6M-60M = 4.6M, 4.6M-1.03M(daily record) = 3.6M, 3.6M/7d = continual grow to 0,47M/d followed by 1.03M/d record]

The previous record was set during the 1970 Osaka World Expo in Japan, which about 64 million people attended over a six month period.
[Japan beaten and also plan 70 million visitors fulfilled:]

http://news.xinhuanet.com/english2010/china/2010-10/24/c_13572635.htm
Some 451,200 visitors entered into the Expo Park by 11 a.m. Sunday [24. oct], bring the total number to 70.159 million
The number of visitors broke the previous record set during the 1970 Osaka World Expo in Japan, which attracted 64 million people, on Oct. 18 when it reached 65.8 million.
[17.oct-18.oct 65.8M-64.62M = 1.2M, 1.2M/2d = average 0.6M/d]
[19.oct-24.oct 70.159M-65.8M = 4.36M, 4.36M/6d = average 0.73M/d]

From cina.exil.sk http://www.exil.sk/site/cina.php/2010/10/25/sanghajske_expo_2010, author Tibor Blazko.

Oct 13

Here is a translation of an op-ed from a Chinese blog about Liu’s Nobel that we at FM found interesting.

So here goes the news again: Public Enemy Number One in China, Liu Xiao Bo, has been awarded the Nobel Prize!  Not sure where that infamous title of Liu came from.  But this latest Nobel prize must be giving people in the U.S. quite a laugh.

The award of a Nobel to Liu is certainly controversial. Allegedly, the Nobel committee itself was internally divided. But given Liu’s high profile conviction last year, this decision is not totally unexpected. I originally did not plan to write about Liu. However, given the renewed and widespread interest of Liu’s Nobel, I have decided to wade in my thoughts. Here is a translation of what a typical report in the West is like. Continue reading »

Oct 08

minipost-Liu Xiaobo

Written by: rolf | Filed under:-chinese-posts, -guest-posts, -mini-posts, General | Tags:, , ,
1 Comment » newest

Liu Xiaobo has received money from the American government for years:

Wikipedia: “Liu Xiaobo … President of the Independent Chinese PEN Center since 2003”, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liu_Xiaobo

Grants to Liu Xiaobo, President of ICPC, “Independent Chinese PEN Centre, Inc.”, from the NED (National Endowment for Democracy), a US government entity:

Independent Chinese PEN Centre, Inc. (2009)
http://www.ned.org/where-we-work/asia/china
Scroll down to “Independent Chinese PEN Centre, Inc.”
$152,950

Independent Chinese PEN Centre, Inc. (2007)
$135,000
http://www.ned.org/publications/annual-reports/2007-annual-report/asia/description-of-2007-grants/china

Independent Chinese PEN Centre, Inc. (2006)
$135,000
http://www.ned.org/publications/annual-reports/2006-annual-report/asia/description-of-2006-grants/china

Total sum from NED for Independent Chinese PEN Centre: US $422 950

Chinese PEN Center is not the only source of money for Liu Xiaobo. He also gets money from NED for Minzhu Zhongguo, “Democratic China, Inc.”, where he is the Founder:

http://www.ned.org/where-we-work/asia/china
Scroll down to “Democratic China, Inc.”
$195,000 (2009)
$18,000 (Supplement)

Democratic China, Inc.
$145,000 (2007)
http://www.ned.org/publications/annual-reports/2007-annual-report/asia/description-of-2007-grants/china

Democratic China, Inc.
$136,000 (2005)
http://www.ned.org/publications/annual-reports/2005-annual-report/asia/description-of-2005-grants/china

Total sum Democratic China, Inc. from NED: $ 494 000

Total support from NED during the three years is US$ 916 950 which is about 7 million yuan – a huge sum of money in China – where salaries are about 20% of the level in Western countries.

NED (National Endowment for Democracy) is funded by the American government, and is subject to congressional oversight – which is a prettier word for “government control”. The purpose is to fund individuals, political parties and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) favourable to US interests.

The payment from NED to US-friendly groups is not a new thing. Eric T. Hale showed in his dissertation (2003) that during the 1990s, China and Russia were awarded the highest number of NED grants with 222 and 221, respectively. Total payment to groups in China during these ten years was astonishing US$ 20.999.229, which equals 140 million Chinese yuan.
http://etd.lsu.edu/docs/available/etd-1105103-140728/unrestricted/Hale_dis.pdf

In 1991, Allen Weinstein, who helped draft the legislation establishing NED, candidly said: “A lot of what we do today was done covertly 25 years ago by the CIA.” In effect, the CIA launders money through NED. (Washington Post, Sept.22, 1991)

New York Times wrote on December 4, 1985: “The National Endowment for Democracy is a quasi-governmental foundation created by the Reagan Administration in 1983 to channel millions of Federal dollars into anti-Communist ‘private diplomacy.'”
http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/subjects/l/labor_role_in_politics/index.html?s=oldest&query=POLITICS%20AND%20GOVERNMENT&field=des&match=exact

Republican congressman from the Texas Gulf Coast, Dr. Ron Paul, who is more Libertarian than Republican, writes: “The misnamed National Endowment for Democracy is nothing more than a costly program that takes US taxpayer funds to promote favored politicians and political parties abroad. What the NED does in foreign countries … would be rightly illegal in the United States.”
http://www.iefd.org/articles/paying_to_make_enemies.php

Former CIA-agent Ralph McGehee writes: “… the current US policy of using (rightly or wrongly) the theme of human rights violations to alter or overthrow non-US-favored governments. In those countries emerging from the once Soviet Bloc that is forming new governmental systems; or where emerging or Third World governments resist US influence or control, the US uses ‘human rights violations,’ as an excuse for political action operations. ‘Human Rights’ replaces ‘Communist Conspiracy’ as the justification for overthrowing governments.”

Patrick French writes “The NED constitutes, so to speak, the CIA’s “civilian arm”.”

In that meaning The Nobel Peace Prize Committee’s decision becomes a political plot, and Liu Xiaobo becomes an American agent.

Oct 01

Reflections on China’s One-Child Policy

Written by: berlinf | Filed under:General | 11 Comments » newest 2011-11-22 19:20:50

The following reflections were based on an interview with a student on Chinese perspectives on the “one-child” policy:

If China is leaving the “world factory” model, economy is not necessarily the only driver of this change. There are other factors at play, for instance, the family planning policy.

Recently I called my youngest sister, who worked in Kunshan, a prosperous industrial city near Shanghai, and we chatted about the job situation there. She said factory jobs are easy to get these days. I asked why that is the case. She said most potential workers are single children in the family. “If you were their parents, wouldn’t you want your only child to go to college and get a better job?” Continue reading »

Aug 27

Legitimacy, Democracy and Chinese Government

Written by: whooper | Filed under:General, Opinion | 346 Comments » newest 2013-08-18 12:41:35

In order to understand any system of government, we need to understand the extent to which government aligns itself with the common good. For example, Fredrick the Great, King of Prussia 1740 to 1786, was an example of a famously benevolent and progressive despot who transformed his country from a relative backwater into an intellectual and military superpower. An interesting question is what mechanisms, if any, protected the Prussians against selfish / incompetent Kings? The answer is brutal, in 18th Century Europe incompetent regimes tended to be annihilated by their neighbours, because in the long run the common good, the flourishing of society, brings economic success and military power. For example, the Ottoman Empire eventually disappeared because its failure to embrace Prussia’s progressive values left it weaker than its European neighbours.

Today Political Scientists talk about the concept of “government legitimacy”. Defining legitimacy is actually quite difficult, but some of the ideas we tend to associate with it include benevolence, competence and popular support.
Continue reading »

Jul 02

Something a bit different – go to the Mercury Brief to read an interesting and personal account of the Chinese education system from Michelle Cui Xiaoxiao.

….In contrast, he argues, Chinese teenagers are never allowed to take risks, which blocks self-understanding and self-reflection. Because Chinese students never confront typical teenage tribulations, they are doomed to live out their teenage years forever.

I am a product of one of these Chinese boarding schools, and a participant in many small acts of teenage rebellion. Yes, we were required to wear uniforms and were not allowed to wear jewelry. But my desk-mate and I had fun sneaking ear studs behind our hair, an act we perceived as extremely defiant. We were not allowed to leave school on weekdays, so we pretended to be sick and obtained special permission from school nurses to leave school for two hours. Then we devoured hamburgers and fries at McDonald’s and came back in time for afternoon classes.

Continue reading »

Jun 26

The ECFA – where next for China and Taiwan?

Written by: Raj | Filed under:economy, General, Opinion, politics | Tags:, , ,
94 Comments » newest 2011-02-07 00:32:51

The ECFA trade agreement between China and Taiwan looks like it will be signed in the near future.

It is hard at this point to be sure of who will benefit the most from it economically. There are concerns in Taiwan that there will be a net loss of jobs as a result of the agreement. Whilst Taiwan will be able to ship goods to China with fewer trade barriers, this does not mean that increased trade will employ more Taiwanese than lose their jobs due to an increase in Chinese imports. After all, some Taiwanese bosses may just pocket increased profit, though others will see increased demand and need to employ more workers. It will be easier to consider the impact of the agreement after it has been in place for a year or two.

But now that the ECFA has been agreed upon, where do Sino-Taiwanese relations go from here? The Wall Street Journal has a suggestion.

Continue reading »

Jun 23

Issues with India/China Relations

Written by: Steve | Filed under:Analysis, General, politics | Tags:, , , , , , ,
87 Comments » newest 2012-10-29 02:25:45

I came across two articles recently, both concerning India/China relations but one written from the Chinese point of view while the other was written from the Indian side. I thought it might be interesting to compare the two viewpoints to see just how far apart they really are.

The first article is from the China Daily while the other is from an Atlantic Council forum. The China Daily article feels there are ‘three gnawing issues’, as they put it. The Indian side looks at it historically, politically and diplomatically. They are both short so I’ll include them in their entirety.

Continue reading »

Jun 09

In the midst of the concrete and steel jungle that is the Shanghai World Expo, stands the Indian Pavilion, the ‘greenest’ of them all, built entirely of environment-friendly materials, showcasing India’s unique brand of Culture, History and Soft Power and offering an unprecedented opportunity to further improve Sino-Indian relations

The Expo has finally come to China. A largely forgotten event in most parts of the world, it has been rejuvenated, on a scale in which no other country could even dream of. A record number of 192 countries and 50 organizations have registered, the highest in the Expo’s history. Most people hadn’t even heard of the expo before it came to China. The verdict is clear – The Expo needed China as much as China needed the Expo.

It has been described by the Chinese government as “a great gathering of world civilizations”,  and is an excellent opportunity to improve ties between two of the oldest – India and China.

Continue reading »

Jun 09

Another perspective on looking at China’s past

Written by: No99 | Filed under:Analysis, General | 66 Comments » newest 2010-07-19 07:03:53

Regarding the topic of China’s long and rich history of science and technology.

Here is one perspective to look at it. Only a few of the points here were made by me, but a lot of information I got from elsewhere and people who study this topic. I will try my best to put what I know so far understandable and straight to the point.
Continue reading »

Jun 01

Across the seas: an iPad’s “gray” voyage

Written by: Nimrod | Filed under:General | 10 Comments » newest 2010-06-08 20:03:40


A shopper looks over an iPad at an Apple Store.

Apple was elated that iPads sold briskly. Then they fretted when they sold out. Apple continues to experience supply shortages, just like with the iPhone release. Where have all the iPads gone? It turns out the iPads are not just made in Chinese factories, but even their distribution is re-routed by networks of Chinese people.

A CBN Weekly (第一财经周刊) feature examines the intricate gray market for iPads, and the role of overseas Chinese in this informal logistics chain.

Continue reading »

May 30

The following is a translation of an op-ed published published in China Review News.

May 27, 2010 – Opinion: the Foxconn Incident is a Reflection of the Growing Pains Associated with China’s Traditional Mode of Development

The recent spate of suicides at Foxconn in China has brought unprecedented attention to this major international manufacturing subcontractor of electronics equipments.  While the causes of these suicides are inevitably complex,  the incidents are a general reflection of the stress the traditional mode of development has wrought on China’s society and provide a warning that change must be brought about soon. Continue reading »

May 26

minipost-[Translation] Profile Of A Foxconn Suicide Jumper

Written by: Charles Liu | Filed under:-mini-posts, culture, General | Tags:, ,
28 Comments » newest 2013-05-03 02:41:42

According to news articles collected by Chinese netters on Baidu Encyclopedia, the 7th Foxconn suicide jumper, Lu Xin, had exhibited mental imbalance. Despite of intervention by Foxconn, Lu took his own life:

http://baike.baidu.com/view/3602162.htm

Lu Xin

Lu Xin, 24 yeras old from Hunan, joined Foxconn Group on Aug 1 2009, part of Foxconn’s 2009 management trainee program. After the incident Foxconn gathered relevant employee, and reported to media. Investigation found, Lu Xin exhibited abnormal behavior prior to May 1 holiday, having thoughts of being chased. Foxconn then arranged employees familiar with Lu for councel and conversation, also contacted Lu’s family to provide care. Despite of these efforts, tragidy was not averted.

“He said someone is trying to kill him”
Continue reading »

May 23

Meet (Dr?) Paul Risenhoover, activist interrupted.

Written by: raventhorn4000 | Filed under:-guest-posts, General | 1 Comment » newest 2013-05-03 03:23:00

In 1999, two Chinese men in US were charged by the US government for allegedly conspiring to traffic in human organs harvested from Chinese prisoners in China.

Harry Wu, participated in a sting operation to gather evidence against the 2 men for the FBI.  The case flopped.  You can read some of the details below.

http://www.nytimes.com/1999/03/16/nyregion/us-judge-voids-charges-2-tried-to-sell-organs-of-chinese-prisoners.html?pagewanted=1

But what happened?

Turns out, the defendants maintained that they were entrapped into the alleged scheme by a Paul Risenhoover, who then turn the case information to Harry Wu.

And Paul Risenhoover was unavailable and refused to be available for the trial.

Recently the colorful Dr. Risenhoover resurfaced, this time filing a charge of Genocide against US in the ICC.

http://www.mvariety.com/2010040725444/local-news/lawyer-us-committed-genocide-against-nmi.php?Itemid=0

(although one should take his doctorate degree for further examination, and BTW, he’s not a lawyer, because he never passed a bar).

But apparently, the genocide charge came about after his failed lawsuit in the US courts relating to some business of his.

Which makes one wonder, what were the FBI folks (and Harry Wu) thinking in 1999 in taking information from Dr. Paul Risenhoover?  Low standards indeed.

But as expected, it takes all sort of strange like-minded bedfellows to form a movement.

http://unheardnomore.blogspot.com/2010/04/controversial-risenhoover-files-case.html

April 6, 2010

Dr. Paul Risenhoover of Robin Hood International Human Rights Legal Defense Fund filed a 200-page lawsuit against the federal government on behalf the National Chamorro Association of the Mariana Islands according to the Saipan Tribune. The National Chamorro Association of the Mariana Islands president is former alleged labor abuser Glenn H. Manglona. (Domestic helpers on Saipan and on Rota filed labor cases against the former Rota Director of Labor.)
From the Tribune:

The Legal Defense Fund also filed a draft pleading with the International Court of Justice on behalf of the “native Chamorro and Carolinian Indian nationals and Formosans,” concerning the U.S. and Japan’s violations of duties and responsibilities to protect Chamorros and Carolinians under a Treaty of Peace between the two countries.

“What this lawsuit tries to accomplish is to invoke Chamorro and Carolinian rights as tribal people. We have certain rights that are not being provided by the U.S. government. In a nutshell, we can make the Covenant better. It’s not perfect but we can make it better for us,” said Manglona.

The Legal Defense Fund said that while U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia Judge Paul L. Friedman has upheld the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service’s issuance of the rules to be acceptable to the statutory and Covenant authority of Congress, he has not ruled on whether the Constitution gives Congress the authority to enter into the Covenant.

I downloaded some of the “legal” documents filed in this case, and seriously could not make sense of them. They did not look like legal documents, but like drafts cut and pasted by someone outside of the legal profession. Here are some of the legal (?) documents filed with the U.S. Court of Appeals, Ninth Circuit Court.

I find it extremely ironic that the leader of a so-called “human rights organization” was involved with promoting the violation of human rights. Dr. Risenhoover promoted the recruitment of innocent Palauans and Micronesians to work in the filthy and abusive Agriprocessor Plant in Postville Iowa. (See this post: Baloney)

In an August 2008 news article Dr. Paul Risenhoover called for workers from the Marshalls, Palau and other Micronesian Islands to work in the non-union, abusive meat packing plant.

The article stated: “The factory owners are Orthodox Jews who produce Kosher religious meat for Jewish families and many Seventh Day Adventists, purchase their Kosher meats.” I guess they cared how their meat was prepared, but were not concerned that workers were abused and their human rights were denied. A Marianas Variety article also covered the news saying that Dr. Risenhoover told Palauans of the “opportunity” during an Austronesian Forum in 2008.
His recruitment of workers took place after the well-publicized outrage and exposure of illegalities and abuses at the plant. In May 2008 the plant was the site of an immigration raid that led to the arrest of 389 illegal workers and eventual charges against former executive Sholom Rubashkin and several managers.

In April 2009 Elizabeth Billmeyer, personnel manager, was convicted of one count of conspiracy to harbor undocumented aliens for profit and one count of knowingly accepting false resident alien cards. In September 2009 the chief financial officer of Agriprocessor Plant, Mitchell Meltzer, pleaded guilty to conspiracy for making false statements to a bank.

Risenhoover is a board member of the Free China Movement. He has quite the controversial past. In 2007 he was deported from Taiwan, blacklisted, and denied reentry for six months. He filed a court case challenging passport denial for being behind in child support payments. A Wikepedia article states:

“The Court characterized Risenhoover’s complaint as “a scrambled collection of conspiracy allegations and unexplained citations to federal statutes.” Risenhoover maintained that he was subject to certain cognitive disorders and should not be discriminated against on this basis. Risenhoover argued he was effectively in custody, wherever he was, because he was unable to travel internationally without a passport.

Due to the unstructured nature of Risenhoover’s pleadings it is difficult to ascertain what ultimately happened but it is clear from the exhibits that he flew from Kaohsiung to Tokyo on February 26, 2006. Further he complained of ill-treatment by the authorities at or about that time.

He lost the case.

Dr. Risenhoover is apparently well-known in courtrooms. In 1999 The New York Times reported that a judge threw out out a lawsuit concerning selling human organs. The judge called Risenhoover a “fraudulent opportunist.”

From the article:

Federal charges against two men accused of conspiring to sell human organs taken from Chinese prisoners were dismissed yesterday by a judge who sharply criticized the Government for building its case around an informant she denounced as ”a fraudulent opportunist.”

Judge Deborah A. Batts of United States District Court in Manhattan said the informant, Paul Risenhoover, had been seeking to overthrow the Chinese Government and might have entrapped the two defendants. She said Mr. Risenhoover was now refusing to return from abroad to appear at trial, which denied the defendants their Constitutional right to cross-examine him.

The The NY Daily News had this to say about the case:

In a caustic, 155-page decision, the judge attacked the government’s case, zeroing in on the use of informant Paul Risenhoover, who admits to opposing the Communist government of China “by any means necessary.”

Risenhoover has “his own political, personal and possibly financial agendas, and he seems to operate on the premise that his desired ends justify any means,” Batts wrote.

You can get an idea of Risenhoover’s political views by reading this 2005 letter to the editor he wrote concerning Taiwan’s independence.

I wouldn’t worry about this case going anywhere.
May 23

Mathematics with ideological flair

Written by: Nimrod | Filed under:General | 12 Comments » newest 2010-06-08 13:55:38


A set of book scans from the Cultural Revolution has been popular with bloggers around the internet the last few months. Here is an interesting one, a secondary school mathematics textbook that begins on this page:

Chairman Mao teaches us: “Never forget class struggle.” Now we shall settle the account on how damned landlord Skinner Qian cruelly exploited peasant Uncle Zhang by his criminal “interest upon interest” scheme (See Figure 1.1).

Peasant Uncle Zhang originally borrowed only 3 Yuan from the damned landlord. After 10 months, “interest upon interest” made it 3*(1+30%)10 Yuan. Now, let’s find out how big this number is.

Then it becomes a normal text, giving a simple exercise in using the log table. Turns out Uncle Zhang owed 41.31 Yuan, but there’s more…
Continue reading »

May 16

Does democracy cause fiscal irresponsibility?

Written by: Nimrod | Filed under:General | 126 Comments » newest 2010-07-30 02:47:53

Let’s begin with some maps:

This is the public debt as a percentage of GDP around the world. It was posted by somebody earlier.

The Economist has constructed a 10-point scale “Democracy Index”, where the larger the number, the higher the degree of “democracy”. Lighter colors are more democratic.

In a previous post, a discussion was opened on whether democracy scales. I argued that a direct, large-scale multi-party electoral democracy gave adverse incentives for irresponsible fiscal decisions. I put forth an argument that the electoral process devolved responsibility to people who could not make them well, and to such a degree that a bad outcome was assured. Is there something to this? Let’s see.
Continue reading »

Apr 18

The stories out of Qinghai tell thousands of tragedies but also many small acts of heroism.  Since the story is developing, with people still being saved, and since I am not on the ground: I will refrain from writing or commenting on the disaster.  However, I will try to translate small stories here and there in the coming weeks to give people more of a flavor to what is going on on the ground.

The following is a short story filed by a reporter from Wuhan regarding his experience traveling to Qinghai to cover the earthquake. The story itself may not be a big deal, but it does detail one of the many spontaneous acts of kindred kindness that people across China are showing for the victims of the disaster. Continue reading »

Apr 15

minipost-Comedian Joe Wong

Written by: Steve | Filed under:-mini-posts, culture, General, language, video | Tags:, , , ,
21 Comments » newest 2011-02-15 11:12:14

Hongkonger sent me a link to Joe Wong, the first Chinese stand up comedian to become successful in the United States. This is his initial network television appearance on the Late Show With David Letterman.  After the jump, I’ve added an interview, another performance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show and a quick comedy sketch of why Joe wants to run for President of the USA.

Continue reading »

Apr 12

Taiwanese Pop Music

Written by: Steve | Filed under:culture, General, music, video | Tags:, , , , ,
58 Comments » newest 2013-07-18 14:57:28

In the past, I’ve written posts about indie music in China, Taiwan and other Asian countries but I haven’t spent much time on pop music since it isn’t really my thing. But I feel it is time to include what is most popular in these countries and I’ll start off with Taiwan. What inspired me to do this? Well, I recently discovered that my brother-in-law’s wife’s cousin (Wen Shang Yi 溫尚翊 also known as Monster) is the lead guitarist and leader of a band called Mayday 五月天 that is quite popular in Taiwan. So as a loyal brother-in-law, I needed an excuse to feature them!

Continue reading »