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Jun 23

Issues with India/China Relations

Written by: Steve | Filed under:Analysis, General, politics | Tags:, , , , , , ,
87 Comments » newest 2012-10-29 02:25:45

I came across two articles recently, both concerning India/China relations but one written from the Chinese point of view while the other was written from the Indian side. I thought it might be interesting to compare the two viewpoints to see just how far apart they really are.

The first article is from the China Daily while the other is from an Atlantic Council forum. The China Daily article feels there are ‘three gnawing issues’, as they put it. The Indian side looks at it historically, politically and diplomatically. They are both short so I’ll include them in their entirety.

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Jun 09

In the midst of the concrete and steel jungle that is the Shanghai World Expo, stands the Indian Pavilion, the ‘greenest’ of them all, built entirely of environment-friendly materials, showcasing India’s unique brand of Culture, History and Soft Power and offering an unprecedented opportunity to further improve Sino-Indian relations

The Expo has finally come to China. A largely forgotten event in most parts of the world, it has been rejuvenated, on a scale in which no other country could even dream of. A record number of 192 countries and 50 organizations have registered, the highest in the Expo’s history. Most people hadn’t even heard of the expo before it came to China. The verdict is clear – The Expo needed China as much as China needed the Expo.

It has been described by the Chinese government as “a great gathering of world civilizations”,  and is an excellent opportunity to improve ties between two of the oldest – India and China.

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Jun 09

Another perspective on looking at China’s past

Written by: No99 | Filed under:Analysis, General | 66 Comments » newest 2010-07-19 07:03:53

Regarding the topic of China’s long and rich history of science and technology.

Here is one perspective to look at it. Only a few of the points here were made by me, but a lot of information I got from elsewhere and people who study this topic. I will try my best to put what I know so far understandable and straight to the point.
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Jun 09

minipost-Power Grows for Stricking Chinese workers. Good for China?

Written by: guest | Filed under:-mini-posts, Analysis | 15 Comments » newest 2010-07-07 01:40:32

Chinese Workers: “I’m mad as hell and not going take it anymore.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/09/business/global/09labor.html?ref=world

The Recent suicides at Foxconn seems to be a watershed moment for Chinese workers who are fed up with the long hours, low pay and crappy cafeteria food. Recent strikes at this company, Honda and KFC recently announced substantial pay raises raises alarm bells for the companies and questions if they can still can produce goods affordability in China. China has already facing a of shortage workers in Guangdong/Shenzhen areas as well while the Chinese government is willing to stand aside and allow these strikes to happen.
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Jun 01

Across the seas: an iPad’s “gray” voyage

Written by: Nimrod | Filed under:General | 10 Comments » newest 2010-06-08 20:03:40


A shopper looks over an iPad at an Apple Store.

Apple was elated that iPads sold briskly. Then they fretted when they sold out. Apple continues to experience supply shortages, just like with the iPhone release. Where have all the iPads gone? It turns out the iPads are not just made in Chinese factories, but even their distribution is re-routed by networks of Chinese people.

A CBN Weekly (第一财经周刊) feature examines the intricate gray market for iPads, and the role of overseas Chinese in this informal logistics chain.

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May 30

The following is a translation of an op-ed published published in China Review News.

May 27, 2010 – Opinion: the Foxconn Incident is a Reflection of the Growing Pains Associated with China’s Traditional Mode of Development

The recent spate of suicides at Foxconn in China has brought unprecedented attention to this major international manufacturing subcontractor of electronics equipments.  While the causes of these suicides are inevitably complex,  the incidents are a general reflection of the stress the traditional mode of development has wrought on China’s society and provide a warning that change must be brought about soon. Continue reading »

May 28

minipost-China: Responsible Stakeholder, Stakeholder, or World Leader?

Written by: Legalist | Filed under:-mini-posts | Tags:,
8 Comments » newest 2013-05-07 03:33:43

Robert Zoellick, former US deputy secretary of state and current World Bank chief, coined a role for China, responsible stakeholder. It was obviously self-serving because the US wanted to retain the right to judge who was responsible and who was not.

China clearly didn’t pick the role up although there are still commentators who say China should do this or that if it is to be a responsible stakeholder.

Furthermore, China doesn’t seem to like the descriptor of stakeholder either. It’s such a neutral term, one doesn’t know what it means anyway.

Instead, China should strive to be a world leader. Like it or not, or exercise it or not, China’s influences on the global economy, energy, environment and security are growing.

China needs to sit at the top table setting rules and enforcing them accordingly for the sake of global prosperity and security. The annual US-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue is a good start.

China can’t claim to be a poor or third-world country for inaction anymore. Many in the world are looking to China for leadership.

May 27

minipost-Should China Ensure Order In Its Neighborhood?

Written by: Legalist | Filed under:-mini-posts, News | Tags:, ,
122 Comments » newest 2010-08-06 19:13:49

War talks are in the air on the Korean peninsula. North Korea sank South Korea’s warship Cheonan. South Korea retaliated by imposing various sanctions on the North. The North responded by imposing its own sanctions on the South.

War can easily happen, by accident or design. South Koreans are nervous. Americans are nervous. Japanese are nervous. And others are nervous, too. Everyone is looking to China to bring the North Koreans to their sense.
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May 26

Bi Yantao’s Note: The incident that happened to Tiantian Zhai has caused a stir in China’s media and blogsphere. Frankly, many people here in China are surprised. How on earth does US define the freedom of speech? All comments are warmly welcome, and I will introduce your insights to China.

China Daily
May 25, 2010

XI’AN/WASHINGTON — Zhai Taishan, the father of a Chinese doctoral degree student in New Jersey accused by US police of attempted arson and making threats, flew from Xi’an, Shaanxi province, to Beijing on Monday night, seeking help from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

“I will never believe that my son is a terrorist,” Zhai said.
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May 26

minipost-[Translation] Profile Of A Foxconn Suicide Jumper

Written by: Charles Liu | Filed under:-mini-posts, culture, General | Tags:, ,
28 Comments » newest 2013-05-03 02:41:42

According to news articles collected by Chinese netters on Baidu Encyclopedia, the 7th Foxconn suicide jumper, Lu Xin, had exhibited mental imbalance. Despite of intervention by Foxconn, Lu took his own life:

http://baike.baidu.com/view/3602162.htm

Lu Xin

Lu Xin, 24 yeras old from Hunan, joined Foxconn Group on Aug 1 2009, part of Foxconn’s 2009 management trainee program. After the incident Foxconn gathered relevant employee, and reported to media. Investigation found, Lu Xin exhibited abnormal behavior prior to May 1 holiday, having thoughts of being chased. Foxconn then arranged employees familiar with Lu for councel and conversation, also contacted Lu’s family to provide care. Despite of these efforts, tragidy was not averted.

“He said someone is trying to kill him”
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May 23

Mathematics with ideological flair

Written by: Nimrod | Filed under:General | 12 Comments » newest 2010-06-08 13:55:38


A set of book scans from the Cultural Revolution has been popular with bloggers around the internet the last few months. Here is an interesting one, a secondary school mathematics textbook that begins on this page:

Chairman Mao teaches us: “Never forget class struggle.” Now we shall settle the account on how damned landlord Skinner Qian cruelly exploited peasant Uncle Zhang by his criminal “interest upon interest” scheme (See Figure 1.1).

Peasant Uncle Zhang originally borrowed only 3 Yuan from the damned landlord. After 10 months, “interest upon interest” made it 3*(1+30%)10 Yuan. Now, let’s find out how big this number is.

Then it becomes a normal text, giving a simple exercise in using the log table. Turns out Uncle Zhang owed 41.31 Yuan, but there’s more…
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May 16

Does democracy cause fiscal irresponsibility?

Written by: Nimrod | Filed under:General | 126 Comments » newest 2010-07-30 02:47:53

Let’s begin with some maps:

This is the public debt as a percentage of GDP around the world. It was posted by somebody earlier.

The Economist has constructed a 10-point scale “Democracy Index”, where the larger the number, the higher the degree of “democracy”. Lighter colors are more democratic.

In a previous post, a discussion was opened on whether democracy scales. I argued that a direct, large-scale multi-party electoral democracy gave adverse incentives for irresponsible fiscal decisions. I put forth an argument that the electoral process devolved responsibility to people who could not make them well, and to such a degree that a bad outcome was assured. Is there something to this? Let’s see.
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May 11

minipost-How To Survive in China as a Foreigner

Written by: Steve | Filed under:-mini-posts, culture, education | Tags:, , ,
58 Comments » newest 2011-06-22 05:50:37

I ran across this recent blog entry posted by Chris Biddle, an American student living in China. It’s short, sweet and to the point.

Bring your own deodorant.  Bring your own coffee.  Get used to the smell of urine.  Smile, a lot.  Learn how to say where your from.  Understand that it’s not rude if someone asks how much money you make.  Listen to music.  Read.  Be patient.  Don’t drink tap water. Try everything at least once, especially the stuff that grosses you out, it will make for a better story.  Get out there and do stuff, try not to use the train of thought “Well, I deserve this,” too often.  If you’re a man, carry a pack of cigarettes with you and offer them to any man you meet.  They will most likely not take one, even if they do smoke, but they will appreciate the sentiment.

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May 06

China’s seasonal politics

Written by: Hohhot | Filed under:Opinion, politics | Tags:, ,
17 Comments » newest 2010-05-10 03:23:10

China’s rapid social transformation is reflected in a different order of priority of the country’s various annual festivals and commemorative days. As the communist state continues to seek tight control over what is permissible, yet as official thinking also adapts to and tries to steer the reclamation of “tradition”, the texture of China’s festive calendar is altering. This change increasingly raises problems for a country and a people caught between the “new” China of the post-1949 period (which is also now “old”) and the “old” China of centuries past (parts of which are again becoming “new”).
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May 04

minipost-Ed Wang-Yao Ming of American football?

Written by: guest | Filed under:-mini-posts | Tags:, ,
39 Comments » newest 2010-07-27 22:57:55

Did you know that there was ethnic history made in the 2010 NFL Draft?

The NFL now has their first full-blooded Chinese descendant in the person of Ed Wang, the 6’5″, 314-lb. offensive tackle.

NFL Chinese

Wang was born and grew up in Northern Virginia, but his parents, George and Nancy, are both native to China. They were both amazing athletes, too. George made the Chinese Olympic team in the high jump, and Nancy made the Olympic team running hurdles. Ed’s got one hell of a set of genes.
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May 01

Sexy Beijing

Written by: Steve | Filed under:culture, language, video | Tags:, , ,
14 Comments » newest 2010-05-21 02:02:35

Vancouver DJ Louis Yu turned me on to the video series Sexy Beijing a few weeks ago. In it, a nice Jewish girl from the USA named Su Fei (her actual name is Anna Sophie Loewenberg) does a “Sex in the City” routine as she scours Beijing looking for hot Chinese guys and commenting on life there. Normally I’m not much of a fan when it comes to foreigners babbling about their grasp of Chinese culture as they spend most of their time with other expats and only have a cursory understanding of the local culture, but this lady is quite good at asking pertinent questions and getting direct answers from the locals, and certainly does not fall into that category. The production is quite good and I found myself enjoying them.

So… what do you think?

The first clip is called Bling Bling in Beijing~

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Apr 24

When I first moved to China to research and write my first novel, I never knew what to say when people asked how I was doing. The truth seemed weak and unwriterly: I was lonely and I wanted to go home.

Instead, I’d ramble about the strangeness of being Chinese American in China, the shocking intensity of Shanghai crowds even to a New Yorker, the absence of family, friends, schoolmates, colleagues. Once, I was rambling in this manner to a new acquaintance, a Shanghai native, when he shrugged and said, “You’re a linglei”—literally translated, a different species. It was a matter-of-fact statement, one that seemed, in two syllables, to sum up my existence.

Four years before, I’d moved to Beijing for a year of postgraduate study with some notions of mastering my mother tongue and reclaiming my heritage. I hadn’t expected to feel at home, but I hadn’t anticipated feeling quite so alien. Like most Asian Americans, I’d always been asked the question, “Where are you from?” with the expected answer being China, or someplace equally foreign. Now, this question was asked even more relentlessly of me by Chinese people in China, but the answer never satisfied them. But you don’t look American, they might say—or, You don’t sound Chinese. They’d assure me that I wasn’t really American, even as their suspicious expressions made clear that I certainly wasn’t really Chinese. Continue reading »

Apr 18

The stories out of Qinghai tell thousands of tragedies but also many small acts of heroism.  Since the story is developing, with people still being saved, and since I am not on the ground: I will refrain from writing or commenting on the disaster.  However, I will try to translate small stories here and there in the coming weeks to give people more of a flavor to what is going on on the ground.

The following is a short story filed by a reporter from Wuhan regarding his experience traveling to Qinghai to cover the earthquake. The story itself may not be a big deal, but it does detail one of the many spontaneous acts of kindred kindness that people across China are showing for the victims of the disaster. Continue reading »

Apr 15

minipost-Comedian Joe Wong

Written by: Steve | Filed under:-mini-posts, culture, General, language, video | Tags:, , , ,
21 Comments » newest 2011-02-15 11:12:14

Hongkonger sent me a link to Joe Wong, the first Chinese stand up comedian to become successful in the United States. This is his initial network television appearance on the Late Show With David Letterman.  After the jump, I’ve added an interview, another performance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show and a quick comedy sketch of why Joe wants to run for President of the USA.

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Apr 14

minipost-Massive Earthquake Hits Qinghai Province

Written by: Steve | Filed under:-mini-posts, natural disaster, News | Tags:, ,
104 Comments » newest 2013-08-05 17:10:50

The latest news clip on the disaster.

Some older clips following the jump.
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Apr 12

Taiwanese Pop Music

Written by: Steve | Filed under:culture, General, music, video | Tags:, , , , ,
58 Comments » newest 2013-07-18 14:57:28

In the past, I’ve written posts about indie music in China, Taiwan and other Asian countries but I haven’t spent much time on pop music since it isn’t really my thing. But I feel it is time to include what is most popular in these countries and I’ll start off with Taiwan. What inspired me to do this? Well, I recently discovered that my brother-in-law’s wife’s cousin (Wen Shang Yi 溫尚翊 also known as Monster) is the lead guitarist and leader of a band called Mayday 五月天 that is quite popular in Taiwan. So as a loyal brother-in-law, I needed an excuse to feature them!

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