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May 04

minipost-Ed Wang-Yao Ming of American football?

Written by: guest | Filed under:-mini-posts | Tags:, ,
39 Comments » newest 2010-07-27 22:57:55

Did you know that there was ethnic history made in the 2010 NFL Draft?

The NFL now has their first full-blooded Chinese descendant in the person of Ed Wang, the 6’5″, 314-lb. offensive tackle.

NFL Chinese

Wang was born and grew up in Northern Virginia, but his parents, George and Nancy, are both native to China. They were both amazing athletes, too. George made the Chinese Olympic team in the high jump, and Nancy made the Olympic team running hurdles. Ed’s got one hell of a set of genes.
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Apr 15

minipost-Comedian Joe Wong

Written by: Steve | Filed under:-mini-posts, culture, General, language, video | Tags:, , , ,
21 Comments » newest 2011-02-15 11:12:14

Hongkonger sent me a link to Joe Wong, the first Chinese stand up comedian to become successful in the United States. This is his initial network television appearance on the Late Show With David Letterman.  After the jump, I’ve added an interview, another performance on The Ellen DeGeneres Show and a quick comedy sketch of why Joe wants to run for President of the USA.

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Apr 14

minipost-Massive Earthquake Hits Qinghai Province

Written by: Steve | Filed under:-mini-posts, natural disaster, News | Tags:, ,
104 Comments » newest 2013-08-05 17:10:50

The latest news clip on the disaster.

Some older clips following the jump.
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Apr 10

minipost-Shanghai’s Singing Chicken Lady

Written by: Steve | Filed under:-mini-posts, culture, music, video | Tags:, ,
1 Comment » newest 2010-05-12 03:28:58

In a Shanghai market, this lady selling chicken said, “If you buy more, I will sing a song for you” and launched into “Amazing Grace”. She’s from a rural village in Anhui province and doesn’t speak or read English. After she finished the song she said, “As long as everybody is happy.” (I hope this translation is correct. If not, please let me know)

Apologies for the cheesy Susan Boyle comparison in the video and the introduction of the song by a western singer before she launches into it. What impressed me the most about this lady was her great attitude.

Apr 10

minipost-[Translation] Greed Destroyed Bob Dylan’s Concert

Written by: Charles Liu | Filed under:-mini-posts, General, music, News | Tags:, , ,
24 Comments » newest 2011-05-14 05:13:38

Recently there were some news about cancelation of Bob Dylan’s concerts in China. Not surprisingly following the usual Western media narrative the dominate theme was the Chinese government had banned Bob Dylan because of censorship, Tibet, the usual.

However, the Chinese netters have been circulating a different story that appeared February this year (UPDATE: also covered by China Music Update in March). According to a music industry insider, Sun Mengjin, cancelation of Dylan’s China concerts had to do with the steep mark up by original concert rights holder (Brokers Brothers) rendering the concert not financially viable for local promoters, and out-of-control greediness in Chinese concert promotion industry:
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Apr 09

minipost-Taiwan’s Version of Whitney Houston

Written by: Steve | Filed under:-mini-posts, culture, media, music, video | Tags:, , , ,
20 Comments » newest 2010-04-25 04:43:58

Lin Yu Chun is a contestant on Taiwan’s version of American Idol called Super Star Avenue. He’s quite young, a bit chubby with a bowl haircut, not the most likely candidate for stardom. But he does a dead on impersonation of Whitney Houston and has gone viral on You Tube with over 2 million…  5 million hits.

Mar 23

minipost-Media hurdle to intercultural relations

Written by: guest | Filed under:-mini-posts, Analysis, media | 84 Comments » newest 2017-08-16 09:59:02

By Bi Yantao (China Daily)
Updated: 2010-03-23

Amid the latest news that Google may soon pull out of China, some Western media outlets are once again criticizing the country’s Internet regulations and press freedom record.

Just as a Chinese scholar told a reporter from The Guardian, it’s the Western media that mainly instigated Western countries to adopt a hostile attitude toward China. That’s why Chinese scholars think the media have not only failed to promote international dialogue and world peace, but also have become a big obstacle to inter-cultural exchanges.
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Mar 15

minipost-Letter: Appreciating the Yuen

Written by: guest | Filed under:-mini-posts, Analysis | Tags:, ,
25 Comments » newest 2010-06-02 13:09:12

There are many articles/news on US accusing China not to appreciate the Yuen. After looking at the arguments from both sides, I have to agree with China.
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Mar 13

minipost-Great wall vital for people’s rights

Written by: guest | Filed under:-mini-posts, Letters, Opinion, politics | 7 Comments » newest 2010-03-15 17:09:00

(Bi Yantao’s Note: Mr. Yu Jianrong is an outspoken Chinese scholar, whom I highly appreciate. Last December I published a commentary to pay support for him when he received criticism from certain governmental officials. On March 11, 2010, People’s Daily published Mr. Yu’s essay entitled “Great wall vital for people’s rights”, which surprises me a bit considering the governmental nature of the paper. To a great degree, the publication of such a critical article in such a governmental newspaper signals the vitality and hope of China, which many China watchers have failed to capture.)

By Yu Jianrong

Social unrest and mass protests can be prevented if the abuse of power is checked and antiquated rules are appraised.
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Mar 09

The execution of a Britain in China for Drug Smuggling raises some interesting questions – including Britain’s integrity and significant lessons for Indian politicians.

Recently the news was packed with what they called the execution by the Chinese Government of a ‘mentally ill’ Britain. He was caught carrying 4 kgs of Heroin in China. His family (surprise surprise!) said that he was mentally ill. And then human rights groups, which are always more than ready to jump in on denouncing China, picked it up.
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Feb 28

minipost-Happy New Year and an Announcement

Written by: Allen | Filed under:-mini-posts, aside, General | Tags:
17 Comments » newest 2010-03-11 06:12:37

Happy New Year of the Tiger! Continue reading »

Feb 28

New York Times recently revealed two schools in China might the be the source of recent Google attack – Jiaotong University (known for its accomplishment in international computing contests) and Lanxiang Vocational School (known for its poor student accommodations, tacky infomercial).

While I have no problem with reports connecting eggheads at Jiaotong University hacking Google, it puzzled me how a 3rd rate voc tech for high school dropouts was implicated. So I decided to dig a little deeper. Continue reading »

Feb 25

Prof. Bi Yantao: Greetings! I am very happy for having this opportunity to ask on issues which are closely followed by the people inside China.

When looking at the Tibet issue, I pay special attention to the term “Greater Tibet”. I have repeatedly read the text of your statement on ‘Greater Tibet’ (including the English version). You said, “Tibet is Tibet. There is no greater or smaller Tibet”. However, the fact of the matter is, during the dialogue process between the Envoys of His Holiness the Dalai Lama and Beijing, the issue of one autonomous administration for all the Tibetan people has been raised. Obviously, it seeks to unify Tibetan areas in Sichuan, Yunnan and Qinghai Provinces into the present day Tibet Autonomous Region (TAR). Given the size of administration, it is indeed a ‘Greater Tibet’. Therefore, on account of that, the ‘Greater Tibet’ which Beijing asserts is not wrong because the reference was made from the present status of Tibet. You have, on one hand opposed the usage of word ‘Greater’ as in ‘Greater Tibet’, while on the other hand, maintained that ‘size should not matter whether big or small’. Are not these two statements contradictory?
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Feb 13

Going along with my intention to write about things that are lighter during this New Year’s season, I’d like to share with you an article I came across Time magazine today. The article is titled Why France’s National Identity Debate Backfired. Here is a short excerpt. Continue reading »

Feb 08

As the Chinese New Year approaches, I think I should write some lighter posts.  So here is something funny I stumbled across on WSJ’s China Realtime Report: Continue reading »

Jan 30

Uln posted a great piece on the Google matter on his blog. Go there to read the whole thing – a selection follows. Continue reading »

Jan 15

(If this one by General Song Zuying Mr. Sha Baoliang gives you goose bumps, visit here for an earlier version of the same song)

In America, I haven’t seen anybody getting married without an exchange of vows that goes something like this: “I, (Bride / Groom), take you (Groom / Bride), to be my (wife / husband), to have and to hold from this day forward, for better or for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish; from this day forward until death do us part. “

Traditionally Chinese wedding does not have such formal vows.  The newly-weds just have three bows during a wedding, usually announced by a wedding host:  “First, bow to the heaven and earth; second, bow to the parents; third, bow to each other!”  Continue reading »

Jan 13

minipost-Learning about the Chinese Mind through Chinese Food

Written by: berlinf | Filed under:-mini-posts, culture, education | 22 Comments » newest 2010-01-31 14:33:10

This may not be a profound truth that I just discovered, but have you noticed that Chinese food and Chinese thinking have a lot to do with each other? Obvious as it may seem, one can become more reflective after encounters with another type of food and thinking behind it. In my case, the comparison is between China and America.

1. In cooking we don’t have “1 cup”, “1/4 cup”, “1 teaspoon” measurement, we say “a little salt”. Exactly how little is little, it’s all a matter of exposure (to other cooks), exchange (of experience) and experience (of your own practice). We don’t have “preheat oven to 425 degrees” either, we say “small fire”, “medium fire”, “”big fire”. Scratch your head and think what these mean. The Chinese mind is similarly conditioned to process such chaotic vagueness with ease and patience.

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Jan 13

Google issued a press release on their blog just a few hours ago pertaining to their operation in China. It is big news and will take some time to digest. I don’t want to comment, just get the story out.  Continue reading »

Jan 07

minipost-Haier does true wireless HDTV

Written by: dewang | Filed under:-mini-posts, economy, technology | 23 Comments » newest 2013-06-27 15:49:52

Haiers true wireless HDTV (gizmodo.com)

Haier's true wireless HDTV (gizmodo.com)


The word “wireless” has really become an oxymoron. For example, are cell phones really wireless? Not really, because without a charging cable, cell phones are useless. At the 2010 Consumer Electronics Show (CES), Haier has demonstrated a true wireless HDTV. No wires. No power cable.
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Jan 07

minipost-Public Opinion in Taiwan

Written by: Steve | Filed under:-mini-posts, General, Opinion, politics | Tags:, , ,
46 Comments » newest 2011-02-07 00:45:51

I recently came across an opinion poll from the Global View Survey Research Center concerning present public opinion in Taiwan on a range of subjects. In the past, many of us have commented on the state of affairs in Taiwan, not only in terms of her relationship to China but also involving the political thought within the nation. Rather than draw any conclusions, I thought I’d make this same data available to our blog members and see what you think.

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